Understanding the sociomaterial boundary qualities of livelihood resilience to climate change: Toward a methodological framework for more systematic social analysis

Lawless, Christopher (2015). Understanding the sociomaterial boundary qualities of livelihood resilience to climate change: Toward a methodological framework for more systematic social analysis. UNU-EHS Working Paper. UNU-EHS.

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  • Sub-type Working paper
    Author Lawless, Christopher
    Title Understanding the sociomaterial boundary qualities of livelihood resilience to climate change: Toward a methodological framework for more systematic social analysis
    Series Title UNU-EHS Working Paper
    Volume/Issue No. 15
    Publication Date 2015-02
    Place of Publication Bonn
    Publisher UNU-EHS
    Pages 22
    Language eng
    Abstract This paper focuses on the status of resilience as a candidate ‘boundary object’ for facilitating communication and interaction on climate change between actors possessing differing social standpoints and worldviews. The paper argues that resilience possesses two differing properties, while resilience can be regarded as a boundary object, it may also come about through the emergence of boundary objects and related entities. In considering various forms of ‘boundary work’, the paper addresses limitations among current literature which have approached climate change issues using boundary studies. A series of structural factors are introduced, namely power, reflexivity, institutions and scale, which make a number of potential variables and themes visible. These can assist in moving boundary studies beyond narrow and localized empirical foci. The framework outlined here provides a methodological resource to facilitate the design of boundary studies of climate change which are more systematic, scalable and comparable.
    Copyright Holder UNU-EHS
    Copyright Year 2015
    Copyright type All rights reserved
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    Created: Thu, 21 May 2015, 17:23:30 JST