A Rapid Review of Environmental Health Gaps in Antimicrobial Resistance and Water-Related Research from 1990–2020

Taing, Lina, Bhatia, Himesh, Kaiser, Rachel A., Qadir, Manzoor and Mehmood, Hamid, (2022). A Rapid Review of Environmental Health Gaps in Antimicrobial Resistance and Water-Related Research from 1990–2020. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19 n/a-n/a

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  • Sub-type Journal article
    Author Taing, Lina
    Bhatia, Himesh
    Kaiser, Rachel A.
    Qadir, Manzoor
    Mehmood, Hamid
    Title A Rapid Review of Environmental Health Gaps in Antimicrobial Resistance and Water-Related Research from 1990–2020
    Appearing in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
    Volume 19
    Publication Date 2022-05-27
    Place of Publication n/a
    Publisher MDPI
    Start page n/a
    End page n/a
    Language eng
    Abstract Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a pervasive global health threat linked to human antimicrobial misuse and abuse, food production, and broader environmental contamination. While global agencies promote a multi-sectoral One Health system approach to equitably combat human, animal, and environmental health AMR risks, it is widely acknowledged that the human and animal sectors dominate discussions. Given this disproportionate focus, identification of critical research gaps is needed to develop stewardship plans that equitably address One Health AMR threats. This review used natural language processing and term frequency algorithms to classify 12,638 records from 1990–2020 thematically in order to highlight sectoral prioritization and gaps. It also specifically assessed water-related gaps as water is recognized as both a primary environmental dissemination pathway and key means of intervention. Drawing from systemic health and integrated water management lenses, this review found that themes related to plant, wildlife, and environmental-related AMR threats—in particular, the role that environmental (ambient) waters play in AMR development, transmission, and spread—are under-prioritized as compared to human and food animal health concerns regardless of geographic region or income level. Further prioritization of these themes is needed to strengthen the environmental dimension of One Health AMR responses and systemically protect global health.
    Copyright Holder The Author
    Copyright Year 2022
    Copyright type Creative commons
    DOI https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116549
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    Created: Tue, 16 Apr 2024, 02:18:53 JST by Mir Matin on behalf of UNU INWEH