Global change, related impact on natural hazard processes, and potential consequences in social-ecological mountain systems

Keiler, Margreth, Schneiderbauer, Stefan and Fuchs, Sven, "Global change, related impact on natural hazard processes, and potential consequences in social-ecological mountain systems" in Safeguarding Mountain Social-Ecological Systems A Global Challenge : Facing Emerging Risks, Adapting to Changing Environments and Building Transformative Resilience in Mountain Regions Worldwide ed. Schneiderbauer, Stefan, Fontanella Pisa, Paola, Shroder, John and Szarzynski, Joerg (Amsterdam: Elsevier B.V., 2023), 23-29.

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  • Author Keiler, Margreth
    Schneiderbauer, Stefan
    Fuchs, Sven
    Book Editor Schneiderbauer, Stefan
    Fontanella Pisa, Paola
    Shroder, John
    Szarzynski, Joerg
    Chapter Title Global change, related impact on natural hazard processes, and potential consequences in social-ecological mountain systems
    Book Title Safeguarding Mountain Social-Ecological Systems A Global Challenge : Facing Emerging Risks, Adapting to Changing Environments and Building Transformative Resilience in Mountain Regions Worldwide
    Publication Date 2023-12-01
    Place of Publication Amsterdam
    Publisher Elsevier B.V.
    Start page 23
    End page 29
    Language eng
    Abstract Mountain social-ecological systems are currently undergoing significant alterations due to changing climate and other environmental conditions as well as social-economic parameters such as urbanization or demographic aging, directly or indirectly influencing the frequency and magnitude of multiple natural hazard processes. This applies to different altitudinal belts and to the processes of both, gradual alterations and sudden events. Changing hazardscapes in mountain areas are influenced by three main drivers and their changing characteristics: the relief, the hydroclimate, and human activities (land use). For example, melting glaciers may cause a change in meltwater discharge, increasing the frequency and/or magnitude of floods and high sediment transport along the rivers. The partly already observed increase in heavy precipitation in many mountain regions may influence the triggering of landslides and debris flows, particularly in areas with environmental pressures such as vegetation cover transition or overgrazing. At the same time, demographic change, economic development, and geopolitical developments alter both the exposure and vulnerabilities of mountain populations to natural hazard processes which may, in turn, lead to changes in potential damage patterns. Even though interconnectedness between different risk-influencing drivers (hazard, exposure, vulnerability) and patterns are undoubtable, evidence for associated system response and quantification of the linkages between different risk drivers is still in its infancy for many mountain regions. This article provides an overview of the most common and most relevant interconnections between the various drivers and system responses within the context of mountain hazard processes. It will attempt to provide an overview of previous and recent research activities on related topics in mountain regions worldwide and present some case studies where local impacts of global change have occurred. Finally, an outlook of future developments is provided.
    Copyright Holder Elsevier Inc.
    Copyright Year 2023
    Copyright type All rights reserved
    DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-822095-5.00004-8
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    Created: Wed, 06 Dec 2023, 23:19:17 JST by Aarti Basnyat on behalf of UNU EHS