Some Potential Lessons from the British Financial Sector's Role in Perpetuating and Ending Chattel Slavery

Draper, Nicholas (2018). Some Potential Lessons from the British Financial Sector's Role in Perpetuating and Ending Chattel Slavery. Financial Sector Commission on Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking Secretariat Briefing Papers. United Nations University.

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  • Sub-type Discussion paper
    Author Draper, Nicholas
    Title Some Potential Lessons from the British Financial Sector's Role in Perpetuating and Ending Chattel Slavery
    Series Title Financial Sector Commission on Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking Secretariat Briefing Papers
    Volume/Issue No. 1a
    Publication Date 2018-09
    Place of Publication New York
    Publisher United Nations University
    Pages 16
    Language eng
    Abstract Both the transatlantic slave trade and the wider slave economy, which the slave trade supplied, were capital-intensive and credit intensive businesses, and the British financial sector was intimately entangled with this transatlantic slave system for two centuries. Such historic entanglement has both parallels to and differences from the relationships today of global, national and local financial institutions with “modern slavery”. This piece seeks to summarize the key features of the British financial sector’s role in perpetuating and ending chattel slavery—in which a person is formally recognized by the law as property—and to suggest some points of contrast and comparison with contemporary campaigns around the international financial sector in the context of modern slavery.
    UNBIS Thesaurus TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS
    FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS
    LAWS AND REGULATIONS
    REPARATION
    SLAVERY
    Keyword Human trafficking
    Modern slavery
    Financial institutions
    United Kingdom
    Copyright Holder United Nations University
    Copyright Year 2018
    Copyright type Creative commons
    ISBN 9789280890969
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    Created: Sat, 29 Feb 2020, 07:39:22 JST by Dursi, Anthony on behalf of UNU Centre