Urbanization, Extreme Events, and Health: The Case for Systems Approaches in Mitigation, Management, and Response

Siri, José G., Newell, Barry, Proust, Katrina and Capon, Anthony G., (2015). Urbanization, Extreme Events, and Health: The Case for Systems Approaches in Mitigation, Management, and Response. Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, 28(2S), 15S-27S

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  • Sub-type Journal article
    Author Siri, José G.
    Newell, Barry
    Proust, Katrina
    Capon, Anthony G.
    Title Urbanization, Extreme Events, and Health: The Case for Systems Approaches in Mitigation, Management, and Response
    Appearing in Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
    Volume 28
    Issue No. 2S
    Publication Date 2015-07-28
    Place of Publication California
    Publisher Sage Publications
    Start page 15S
    End page 27S
    Language eng
    Abstract Extreme events, both natural and anthropogenic, increasingly affect cities in terms of economic losses and impacts on health and well-being. Most people now live in cities, and Asian cities, in particular, are experiencing growth on unprecedented scales. Meanwhile, the economic and health consequences of climate-related events are worsening, a trend projected to continue. Urbanization, climate change and other geophysical and social forces interact with urban systems in ways that give rise to complex and in many cases synergistic relationships. Such effects may be mediated by location, scale, density, or connectivity, and also involve feedbacks and cascading outcomes. In this context, traditional, siloed, reductionist approaches to understanding and dealing with extreme events are unlikely to be adequate. Systems approaches to mitigation, management and response for extreme events offer a more effective way forward. Well-managed urban systems can decrease risk and increase resilience in the face of such events.
    UNBIS Thesaurus CLIMATE CHANGE
    NATURAL DISASTERS
    URBANIZATION
    GOVERNANCE
    Keyword Global health
    Urban Health
    Systems thinking
    Copyright Holder Asia Pacific Academic Consortium for Public Health
    Copyright Year 2015
    Copyright type All rights reserved
    DOI 10.1177/1010539515595694
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    Created: Mon, 24 Jul 2017, 15:56:26 JST by Cheah, Swee Neo on behalf of UNU IIGH