Maintaining and building ‘place’ through managed and forced community relocations: Lessons for a climate changed world

Adams, Helen, Alaniz, Ryan, Bronen, Robin and McNamara, Karen (2015). Maintaining and building ‘place’ through managed and forced community relocations: Lessons for a climate changed world. UNU-EHS Working Paper. UNU-EHS.

Document type:
Report

Metadata
Documents
Versions
Statistics
  • Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UNU Collections credentials)
    Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
    Maintaining_and_building_place_WP_No_16.pdf Maintaining_and_building_place_WP_No_16.pdf application/pdf 454.65KB
  • Sub-type Working paper
    Author Adams, Helen
    Alaniz, Ryan
    Bronen, Robin
    McNamara, Karen
    Title Maintaining and building ‘place’ through managed and forced community relocations: Lessons for a climate changed world
    Series Title UNU-EHS Working Paper
    Volume/Issue No. 16
    Publication Date 2015-02
    Place of Publication Bonn
    Publisher UNU-EHS
    Pages 23
    Language eng
    Abstract Climate-induced environmental change is likely to render some of the places in which people live and maintain livelihoods uninhabitable. While our understanding of the interactions between environmental change and migration has increased, less attention has been paid to places becoming uninhabitable and the processes of relocating entire communities. Therefore this article attempts to fill this gap in our understanding, by applying concepts from place attachment literature to two different relocation cases through the experiences of affected communities: a managed and voluntary relocation of a coastal village in Alaska; and a forced relocation post-disaster in Honduras. In this article, we posit that a decrease in resilience is, in part, a function of how resilience is bound up in place and identity, and associated with the specific characteristics of the location. Four main findings emerge. Firstly, place attachment is transferable between locations if certain resources to which attachment and identity are formed remain constant. Secondly, to increase resilience we may want to break attachment with place, when this attachment is to negative practices and relationships. Thirdly, positive place attachment associated with resilient communities can be created in new locations, representing a case of ‘building back better’. Finally, access to decision-making processes by communities is crucial for successful relocation. Taking into account place attachment and identity not only increases resilience to climate change impacts and extremes but raises both collective social capital and individual wellbeing.
    Copyright Holder UNU-EHS
    Copyright Year 2015
    Copyright type All rights reserved
  • Versions
    Version Filter Type
  • Citation counts
    Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
    Access Statistics: 6669 Abstract Views, 277 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
    Created: Thu, 21 May 2015, 18:12:07 JST