Safe water shortages, gender perspectives, and related challenges in developing countries: The case of Uganda

Baguma, David, Hashim, Jamal H., Aljunid, Syed M., Michael Hauser, Helmut Jung and Loiskandl, Willibald, (2012). Safe water shortages, gender perspectives, and related challenges in developing countries: The case of Uganda. Water Policy, 14 & 442 96-102

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  • Sub-type Journal article
    Author Baguma, David
    Hashim, Jamal H.
    Aljunid, Syed M.
    Michael Hauser
    Helmut Jung
    Loiskandl, Willibald
    Title Safe water shortages, gender perspectives, and related challenges in developing countries: The case of Uganda
    Appearing in Water Policy
    Volume 14 & 442
    Publication Date 2012-11-01
    Place of Publication Amsterdam
    Publisher Elsevier
    Start page 96
    End page 102
    Language English
    Abstract The need for water continues to become more acute with the changing requirements of an expanding world population. Using a logistical analysis of data from 301 respondents from households that harvest rainwater in Uganda, the relationship between dependent variables, such as water management performed as female-dominated practices, and independent variables, such as years of water harvesting, family size, tank operation and maintenance, and the presence of local associations, was investigated. The number of years of water harvesting, family size, tank operation and maintenance, and presence of local associations were statistically significantly related to adequate efficient water management. The number of years of water harvesting was linked to women's participation in household chores more than to the participation of men, the way of livelihoods lived for many years. Large families were concurrent with a reduction in water shortages, partially because of the availability of active labour. The findings also reveal important information regarding water-related operations and maintenance at the household level and the presence of local associations that could contribute some of the information necessary to minimise water-related health risks. Overall, this investigation revealed important observations about the water management carried out by women with respect to underlying safe-water shortages, gender perspectives, and related challenges in Uganda that can be of great importance to developing countries.
    Keyword Associations
    Active labour
    Rainwater
    Population
    Water management
    Copyright Holder Elsevier
    Copyright Year 2012
    Copyright type All rights reserved
    DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.10.004
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    Created: Wed, 11 Jun 2014, 16:20:09 JST