In kind transfers, Household spending behaviour and consumption responses in HIV-affected households: Evidence from Zambia

Tirivayi, Nyasha and Groot, Wim (2010). In kind transfers, Household spending behaviour and consumption responses in HIV-affected households: Evidence from Zambia.

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  • Author Tirivayi, Nyasha
    Groot, Wim
    Title In kind transfers, Household spending behaviour and consumption responses in HIV-affected households: Evidence from Zambia
    Publication Date 2010
    Abstract In this paper we evaluate the effects of a food aid program in households with a patient receiving HIV/AIDS treatment. Using data from a food transfer program in Zambia, we employ propensity score matching, non-parametric analysis and instrumental variables (with double difference) methods to estimate the effects of food aid rations on household spending and food consumption. We find that food transfers have a significant positive effect on total expenditures, food consumption expenditures and actual food intake. This demonstrates that integrating HIV/AIDS treatment with food transfers leads to greater welfare gain compared to HIV/AIDS treatment alone. Our findings depart somewhat from theoretical predictions on inframarginal in-kind transfers but are consistent with empirical literature on inframarginal food stamps. We also find that program participants have a larger marginal propensity to consume food out of food transfers compared to the marginal propensity to consume food out of cash income. Our findings are consistent with empirical literature on intrahousehold decision making regarding social transfers, as female-headed households in our study spend more on food compared to male headed households. This study was made possible with funding from UNAIDS, World Health Organisation, Ford Foundation and Poverty, Equity and Growth Network. The study was carried out with logistical and operational assistance from the World Food Programme (WFP Zambia), the Ministry of Health and the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia. Necessary approval was obtained from the University of Zambia Research Ethics Committee and the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Zambia. We especially acknowledge the support received from the director of WFP Zambia, Pablo Recalde and the deputy director, Purnima Kashyap. We are deeply indebted to Calum McGregor for all the preparations and the arrangements he made for this study to be successful. We also particularly acknowledge the following individuals for their assistance in carrying out the study. From WFP; Lusako Sichali, Alice Mzumara, Jennifer Sakwiya, Fanwell Hamusonde, Allan Mulando and Peter Kasonde. We are also grateful to the following individuals from CIDRZ; Carolyn Bolton, Kapata Bwalya, Andrew Westfall, Mark Giganti and Kalima and from PUSH; Bruce Mulenga and Godfrey Phiri, and Joseph Mudenda from the Ministry of Health. We are also grateful for the support and assistance provided by the Central Statistical Office of the Republic of Zambia, Programme for Urban Self Help, the National Food and Nutrition Commission, and the efforts of the Enumerators, Community Liaison Officers, Food Committee Members, Adherence Support Workers, Support Group Leaders and Home Based Caregivers.
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    Created: Fri, 13 Dec 2013, 12:14:32 JST