The veil, the clearing and the flow: New commons of Japanese traditional gardens in Kanazawa city

Pastor-Ivars, Juan, "The veil, the clearing and the flow: New commons of Japanese traditional gardens in Kanazawa city" in Urban Nature -Enriching Belonging, Wellbeing and Bioculture- (London and New York: Routledge, 2020), 26-50.

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  • Author Pastor-Ivars, Juan
    Chapter Title The veil, the clearing and the flow: New commons of Japanese traditional gardens in Kanazawa city
    Book Title Urban Nature -Enriching Belonging, Wellbeing and Bioculture-
    Publication Date 2020-11-16
    Place of Publication London and New York
    Publisher Routledge
    Start page 26
    End page 50
    Language eng
    Abstract Abstract In nature, mountains, valleys and rivers contribute to landscape diversity. Landscape architecture is responsible for converting natural archetypes into types and including them in socially established, formal, urban natural settings, such as gardens, parks, sacred enclosures etc. The level of conservation of urban nature indicates the intimate and collective relationship that human beings maintain with nature in cities. This chapter focuses on the formal version of urban nature created in Japan; specifically, the Japanese traditional garden, a space created in between nature. It takes up a spatial analysis from a model built on the abstraction of “space in nature”. Concretely, the spatial types of the veil, the clearing and flow are advocated as the spatial components structuring Japanese traditional gardens. It deepens in their ancient sacred archetypes, spatial notions, characteristics and techniques, functions and biocultural diversity. To achieve a comprehensive perspective, the subject has been approached from three complementary spheres: philosophy, design and ecology, showing the case of Kanazawa city. Through reading these three parts, a new sustainable and resilient model of the Japanese traditional garden will emerge, relating them to the current social, environmental and economic debates. The chapter also discusses the need to reinterpret traditional wisdom as the basis for the creation of a new urban nature, and it reveals clues about how to restore kinship with nature.
    Copyright Holder selection and editorial matter, Michelle L. Cocks and Charlie M. Shackleton; individual chapters, the contributors
    Copyright Year 2021
    Copyright type All rights reserved
    ISBN 978036742757
    DOI https://doi.org/10.4324/9780367854898
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    Created: Tue, 14 Sep 2021, 15:47:22 JST by Miwa Higashimuki on behalf of UNU IAS