Promoting Waste-to-Energy: Nexus Thinking, Policy Instruments, and Implications for the Environment

Hettiarachchi, Hiroshan and Kshourad, Chandrashekar, "Promoting Waste-to-Energy: Nexus Thinking, Policy Instruments, and Implications for the Environment" in Current Developments in Biotechnology & Bioengineering: Waste Treatment Processes for Energy Generation ed. Kumar, Sunil, Kumar, Rakesh and Pandey, Ashok (Amsterdam: Susan Dennis, 2019), 163-184.

Document type:
Book Chapter

Metadata
Links
Versions
Statistics
  • Author Hettiarachchi, Hiroshan
    Kshourad, Chandrashekar
    Book Editor Kumar, Sunil
    Kumar, Rakesh
    Pandey, Ashok
    Chapter Title Promoting Waste-to-Energy: Nexus Thinking, Policy Instruments, and Implications for the Environment
    Book Title Current Developments in Biotechnology & Bioengineering: Waste Treatment Processes for Energy Generation
    Publication Date 2019
    Place of Publication Amsterdam
    Publisher Susan Dennis
    Start page 163
    End page 184
    Language eng
    Abstract Waste management practices have always been flexible enough to incorporate modern technology without disrupting their intended purpose. Modern-day waste management should also entail ways to benefit from this resource, not simply burying or burning it, as used to be the case. One promising technique is undoubtedly waste-to-energy (WTE) conversion. It offers an efficient means of managing waste that fits ideally with the needs of large population centers, while providing a source of alternative and renewable energy. In this context the objective of this chapter is to discuss how we may use various policy instruments to promote WTE to maximize its benefits to society. One interesting way to understand the relationship between waste and energy is to look at WTE through the water–energy–food (WEF) nexus. The role of waste in the WEF nexus and how it can be enhanced through WTE and correct policy interventions are discussed in the first half of the chapter. For the ease of discussion, we have grouped the stakeholders into categories: manufacturers, consumers, collectors, operators, and policy makers/implementers. How policy instruments may assist us in promoting WTE is then discussed by taking five different examples: banning combustible waste from landfills, financial incentives to reduce the existing landfill footprint, WTE certificates, variable tax rates for different wastes, and the mandatory labeling of energy potential. While one of these instruments has already been implemented, the others are new or modified suggestions of policy instruments found in other disciplines. Where appropriate, these policy instruments are also elaborated using brief case studies. The implications for the environment are also discussed at the end of the chapter along two themes: WTE as a method of waste management and as a method of energy production. The carbon neutrality of WTE is a major strength, and from the sustainability point of view WTE is much more promising than landfilling.
    UNBIS Thesaurus WASTE MANAGEMENT
    Keyword Incineration
    Landfilling
    Municipal solid waste (MSW)
    Nexus thinking
    Policy instruments
    Renewable energy
    Sustainability
    Waste segregation
    Waste to energy (WTE)
    Copyright Holder Elsevier B.V.
    Copyright Year 2019
    Copyright type All rights reserved
    DOI 10.1016/B978-0-444-64083-3.00009-9
  • Versions
    Version Filter Type
  • Citation counts
    Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
    Access Statistics: 126 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
    Created: Tue, 15 Jan 2019, 21:04:41 JST by Claudia Matthias on behalf of UNU FLORES