Fostering biocultural diversity in landscapes through place-based food networks: a ‘‘solution scan’’ of European and Japanese models

Plieninger, Tobias, Kohsaka, Ryo, Bieling, Claudia, Hashimoto, Shizuka, Kamiyama, Chiho, Kizos, Thanasis, Penker, Marianne, Kieninger, Pia, Shaw, Brian J., Sioen, Giles B., Yoshida, Yuki and Saito, Osamu, (2017). Fostering biocultural diversity in landscapes through place-based food networks: a ‘‘solution scan’’ of European and Japanese models. Sustainability Science, 1-15

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  • Sub-type Journal article
    Author Plieninger, Tobias
    Kohsaka, Ryo
    Bieling, Claudia
    Hashimoto, Shizuka
    Kamiyama, Chiho
    Kizos, Thanasis
    Penker, Marianne
    Kieninger, Pia
    Shaw, Brian J.
    Sioen, Giles B.
    Yoshida, Yuki
    Saito, Osamu
    Title Fostering biocultural diversity in landscapes through place-based food networks: a ‘‘solution scan’’ of European and Japanese models
    Appearing in Sustainability Science
    Publication Date 2017-07-11
    Place of Publication Online
    Publisher Springer Japan
    Start page 1
    End page 15
    Language eng
    Abstract Many Japanese and European landscapes harbor biocultural diversity that has been shaped by human agency over centuries. However, these landscapes are threatened by widespread land abandonment, land use changes, and urbanization. The aim of this study is to use a ‘‘solution scanning’’ method to identify place-based food networks in Europe and Japan that reinforce linkages between biological and cultural diversity in landscapes. In our analysis of 26 European and 1 3 Japanese cases, we find that place-based food networks are typically located in heterogeneous landscapes, are driven by civil society (and less by markets) , and act at a local scale. Regional identity is the most frequently addressed societal issue. Scenery, rural tourism, and nature conservation are more important motivations in Europe, and physical well-being and revitalization of local economies are more relevant in Japan. European models are typically associated with achieving biodiversity conservation and sociocultural tradition outcomes, and Japanese models more with public health and nutrition outcomes. We discuss the potential for transfer of approaches from Japan to Europe (e.g., models that tackle the aging of rural societies), and from Europe to Japan (e.g., models that build explicit connections between food production and biodiversity conservation). We conclude with a list of recommended policy measures, e .g., the creation of a flexible legal framework that protects the interests of and reduces political constraints for collaborative efforts to biocultural diversity in landscapes.
    Keyword Landscape stewardship
    Cultural landscapes
    Agroecology
    Alternative food networks
    Sustainable landscape management
    Food systems
    Copyright Holder Springer Japan
    Copyright Year 2017
    Copyright type All rights reserved
    DOI 10.1007/s11625-017-0455-z
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    Created: Wed, 12 Jul 2017, 17:03:02 JST by PEGUES, Susan Scott on behalf of UNU IAS