Violence as an obstacle to livelihood resilience in the context of climate change

Tellman, Beth, Alaniz, Ryan, Rivera, Andrea and Contreras, Diana (2014). Violence as an obstacle to livelihood resilience in the context of climate change. UNU-EHS Working Paper. UNU-EHS.

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  • Sub-type Working paper
    Author Tellman, Beth
    Alaniz, Ryan
    Rivera, Andrea
    Contreras, Diana
    Title Violence as an obstacle to livelihood resilience in the context of climate change
    Series Title UNU-EHS Working Paper
    Volume/Issue No. 13
    Publication Date 2014-12
    Place of Publication Bonn
    Publisher UNU-EHS
    Pages 30
    Language eng
    Abstract Central America continues to be a violent region and is prone to increasing climatic shocks and environmental degradation. This paper explores the non-linear feedback loop between violence and climate shocks on livelihood resilience in El Salvador and Honduras, two countries experiencing high rates of violence. The nature of this complex feedback loop is examined by analysing case studies on the community scale, which include challenges in reconstructing community social capital post-Hurricane Mitch (1998) in Honduras and the importance of social capital in community resilience to Hurricane Ida (2009) in El Salvador. We conclude that social capital is central in communities facing violence in order to enhance livelihood resilience to climate change impacts in Central America.
    Keyword Central America
    violence
    Climate change
    Social capital
    livelihood resilience
    Copyright Holder UNU-EHS
    Copyright Year 2014
    Copyright type All rights reserved
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