Consumers’ Attitudes towards Edible Wild Plants: A Case Study of Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan

Chen, Bixia and Qiu, Zhenmian, (2012). Consumers’ Attitudes towards Edible Wild Plants: A Case Study of Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. International Journal of Forestry Research, 2012 n/a-n/a

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  • Sub-type Journal article
    Author Chen, Bixia
    Qiu, Zhenmian
    Title Consumers’ Attitudes towards Edible Wild Plants: A Case Study of Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan
    Appearing in International Journal of Forestry Research
    Volume 2012
    Publication Date 2012-03-07
    Place of Publication London
    Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
    Start page n/a
    End page n/a
    Language eng
    Abstract This study explored the rural revitalizing strategy in FAO's Globally Important Agricultural Heritage System (GIAHS) site in Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture of Japan, using a case study of edible wild plants. This study assessed the current and possible future utilization of edible wild plants as one important NTFP by clarifying the attitudes of consumers and exploring the challenges of harvesting edible wild plants. Traditional ecological knowledge associated with edible wild plants and the related attitudes of consumers towards wild plants was documented. A questionnaire survey found that a majority of the respondents held positive attitude towards edible wild plants as being healthy, safe food, part of traditional dietary culture. Increasing demand of edible wild plants from urban residents aroused conflicts with local residents’ interest given that around 86% of the forested hills are private in Noto Region. Non timber forest products (NTFP) extraction can be seen as a tool for creating socioeconomic relationships that are dependent on healthy, biodiverse ecosystems. It was suggested that Japanese Agricultural Cooperatives (JA) and Forestry Cooperatives (FCA) could be involved with GIAHS process. As important traditional dietary and ecological system, edible wild plants should be a part of GIAHS project for rural revitalization.
    UNBIS Thesaurus JAPAN
    PLANT ECOLOGY
    Human and Socio-economic Development and Good Governance
    DIET
    PLANTS
    Copyright Holder The Authors
    Copyright Year 2012
    Copyright type Creative commons
    DOI 10.1155/2012/872413
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    Created: Tue, 26 Aug 2014, 13:18:20 JST