Use of DEMs data to monitor height changes due to deforestation

Avtar, Ram and Sawada, Haruo, (2012). Use of DEMs data to monitor height changes due to deforestation. Arabian Journal of Geosciences,

Document type:
Article

Metadata
Links
Versions
Statistics
  • Sub-type Journal article
    Author Avtar, Ram
    Sawada, Haruo
    Title Use of DEMs data to monitor height changes due to deforestation
    Appearing in Arabian Journal of Geosciences
    Publication Date 2012
    Publisher Springer Berlin Heidelberg
    Abstract Deforestation has been a major cause of climate change and other environmental problems. An accurate estimation of the volume of deforested area is needed for United Nations Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (UN-REDD+) policies implementation and global carbon accounting. Accurate information about three-dimensional (3-D) structure of forests is required to quantify forest carbon stock. This study demonstrates the use of different digital elevation models (DEMs) to monitor changes in height due to deforestation in Cambodia to support climate change mitigation policies of UN-REDD+. The Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission-DEM (SRTM-DEM), Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer Global DEM (ASTER-GDEM) and Panchromatic Remote sensing Instrument for Stereo Mapping-Digital Surface Model (PRISM-DSM) data were calibrated using Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (ICESat–GLAS) data. The results obtained from this study clearly indicate the changes in the height of forests due to deforestation activity. The height of cutover forest generated from the PRISM-DSM and SRTM-DEM is more reliable than that from the PRISM-DSM and ASTER-GDEM data. Field data has also been used to validate the height of the cutover forests, which shows ±5 m uncertainties in the estimation.
    DOI 10.1007/s12517-012-0768-2
  • Versions
    Version Filter Type
  • Citation counts
    Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
    Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
    Access Statistics: 517 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
    Created: Mon, 14 Apr 2014, 17:14:15 JST