Can savanna burning projects deliver measurable greenhouse emissions reductions and sustainable livelihood opportunities in fire-prone settings?

Russell-Smith, Jeremy, Monagle, Catherine, Jacobsohn, Margaret, Beatty, Robin L., Bilbao, Bibiana, Millán, Adriana, Vessuri, Hebe and Sánchez-Rose, Isabelle, (2013). Can savanna burning projects deliver measurable greenhouse emissions reductions and sustainable livelihood opportunities in fire-prone settings?. Climatic Change, 47-61

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  • Sub-type Journal article
    Author Russell-Smith, Jeremy
    Monagle, Catherine
    Jacobsohn, Margaret
    Beatty, Robin L.
    Bilbao, Bibiana
    Millán, Adriana
    Vessuri, Hebe
    Sánchez-Rose, Isabelle
    Title Can savanna burning projects deliver measurable greenhouse emissions reductions and sustainable livelihood opportunities in fire-prone settings?
    Appearing in Climatic Change
    Publication Date 2013-11-07
    Place of Publication Berlin and Heidelberg
    Publisher Springer
    Start page 47
    End page 61
    Language eng
    Abstract Savannas constitute the most fire-prone vegetation type on earth and are a significant source of greenhouse gas emissions. Most savanna fires are lit by people for a variety of livelihood applications. ‘Savanna burning’ is an accountable activity under the Kyoto Protocol, but only Australia, as a developed economy, accounts for emissions from this source in its national accounts. Over the past decade considerable effort has been given to developing savanna burning projects in northern Australia, combining customary indigenous (Aboriginal) approaches to landscape-scale fire management with development of scientifically robust emissions accounting methodologies. Formal acceptance by the Australian Government of that methodology, and its inclusion in Australia’s developing emissions trading scheme, paves the way for Aboriginal people to commercially benefit from savanna burning projects. The paper first describes this Australian experience, and then explores options for implementing community-based savanna burning emissions reduction projects in other continental savanna settings, specifically in Namibia and Venezuela. These latter examples illustrate that savanna fire management approaches potentially have broader application for contributing to livelihood opportunities in other fire-prone savanna regions.
    UNBIS Thesaurus FIRES
    GRASSLANDS
    TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS
    AUSTRALIA
    NAMIBIA
    VENEZUELA (BOLIVARIAN REPUBLIC OF)
    FIRE CONTROL
    Copyright Holder The Authors
    Copyright Year 2013
    Copyright type All rights reserved
    ISSN 01650009
    DOI 10.1007/s10584-013-0910-5
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