Multinational Firms, Regional Integration and Globalising Markets: Implications for Developing Countries

Narula, Rajneesh (2001). Multinational Firms, Regional Integration and Globalising Markets: Implications for Developing Countries. UNU-MERIT Research Memoranda. UNU-MERIT.

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    Author Narula, Rajneesh
    Title Multinational Firms, Regional Integration and Globalising Markets: Implications for Developing Countries
    Series Title UNU-MERIT Research Memoranda
    Volume/Issue No. 36
    Publication Date 2001
    Publisher UNU-MERIT
    Language eng
    Abstract It is axiomatic that the potential of FDI to act as a catalyst for economic development varies by its motivation, and the competence level and scope of foreign-owned affiliates. This chapter seeks to examine the effect of regional integration (RI) on MNE strategies while acknowledging other globalisation-related developments. We examine MNE strategies in developing countries in four scenarios; (1) in a non-RI, pre-liberalised environment; (2) with RI in a pre-liberalised environment (3) in a non-RI, post-liberalisation scenario, (4) RI in a post-liberalisation scenario. We also distinguish between least developed countries (LDCs), and intermediate developing countries, within North-South and South-South RI. Liberalisation and a shift in policy orientation have had a greater affect on MNE strategies than integration. Globalisation of MNE activity and liberalisation has led to a downgrading of MNE activity in most LDCs. Much of the gains in FDI flows have been a result of redistribution, associated with privatisation. Countries with a threshold level of domestic capability and more efficient institutions have benefited from increases in the quality of FDI. RI schemes have reinforced these trends, benefiting those countries that have a viable domestic sector, and have created the appropriate multilateral institutions to exploit cross-border efficiencies. In general, South-South RI in a post- liberalised world has had limited benefits for LDCs relative to intermediate developing countries. RI schemes need to be seen as an opportunity to respond gradually to globalisation in a controlled and stepwise- manner, and not as an alternative to multilateralism.
    Copyright Year 2001
    Copyright type All rights reserved
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    Created: Fri, 13 Dec 2013, 12:43:19 JST