Awkward states and regional organisations: the United Kingdom and Australia compared

Murray, Philomena, Warleigh-Lack, Alex and He, Baogang, (2013). Awkward states and regional organisations: the United Kingdom and Australia compared. Comparative European Politics, Advance online publication

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  • Sub-type Journal article
    Author Murray, Philomena
    Warleigh-Lack, Alex
    He, Baogang
    Title Awkward states and regional organisations: the United Kingdom and Australia compared
    Appearing in Comparative European Politics   Check publisher's open access policy
    Volume Advance online publication
    Publication Date 2013/03/25
    Place of Publication Hampshire
    Publisher Palgrave Macmillan
    Language eng
    Abstract Both the United Kingdom and Australia have been studied by specialists in each region rather than by comparativists. This article seeks to fill this gap by examining the regional �awkwardness� of the United Kingdom and Australia comparatively. Australia and Britain are �awkward� states in their respective regions � Asia and Europe. This is clear in their approaches to institutions, economic policy, security and identity. We examine comparatively the role of power, institutions, economy, domestic politics and culture to see which mix best accounts for the awkward status of these two states. Through this comparison, this article demonstrates that the so-called �uniqueness� of the United Kingdom in regionalism literature is in fact a nearly �universal� phenomenon, insofar as many global regions include awkward states.
    UNU Topics of Focus Regional integration
    Keyword Regionalism
    Regional integration
    European union
    Asia pacific
    Copyright Year 2013
    ISSN 1472-4790
    DOI 10.1057/cep.2013.2
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    Created: Wed, 11 Dec 2013, 12:52:08 JST